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The Girl Who Leapt Through Time

Hello dear readers and a very belated Happy New Year!
I thought we should start this year off with a nice anime movie called The Girl Who Leapt Through Time (2006).
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The story is about Makoto, a young girl who, after a mysterious incident in the science lab, discovers that she can move backwards in time. Well, more specifically (and as the title suggests), she can leap back in time. At first Makoto is having a blast with her newfound powers, but quickly enough she learns that changing the past can have dire consequences for the future. Will she be able to undo her mistakes and create a happy future for herself and her friends?
This is a very sweet movie about friendship, love and learning to understand and deal with the consequences of one’s actions (however it gives a falls impression of the practicality of seriously short school uniforms. That skirt is not ok for leaping in public!). It has won several awards, including the Fantasty Filmfest Official Selection 2007 and the Japan Academy Price of Animation of the Year 2007. It is absolutely a film worth watching!

Love, Elin
tgwltt

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A Short Disclaimer

Do not despair, dear readers! We have not quit you again! It’s just that we’re currently spending Christmas with our families, which leaves precious little time for blogging. Rest assured, we will keep on blogging in the new year. You are not abandoned!

Happy Christmas, everybody!

Love, Vili Flik.

Darkness at Noon

“Nobody can rule guiltlessly” Saint-Just

Ok, so I’ll be the first to admit that Darkness at Noon (1940) by Arthur Koestler is perhaps not the most cosy, it’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas read. However, the book is brilliant and should be a must read for everyone everywhere.

It is set in Russia in 1938, and starts with the main character, Rubashov, being arrested in the middle of the night. This short book (at least according to Wikipedia) “express the author’s disillusionment with the Soviet Union’s practice of Communism.”

We follow Rubashov into imprisonment, through interrogation, corruption, and torture. The book is so well written that when I was reading it this summer, in a room full of people, I had to force myself to look up every now and then just to remind myself that I was not in an interrogation room headed for a show trial, and that I was, in fact perfectly safe. It’s a book and a story that gets under your skin. And it should, seeing that it actually tells a story that many were forced to experience in the 1930s.

Sewing Rooms

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So, this is my brand new sewing room. Or rather, “the room formerly known as the kitchen”.
(The opposite side of the room looks like this:)
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It is not nearly as cozy as I would like it to be (though slightly cozier than this picture makes it out to be), but it is spacious, and as I am not planning to stay in my current apartment for longer than absolutely necessary, I can’t be bothered decorating too much.

So in the meantime I wait and I dream about  my future sewing room, the ultimate sewing room, the one I will have next to the library (yes, I will have a library! Come to think of it, maybe I will have the walk in-closet in between so the sewing machine doesn’t disturb the tranquility of the reading room). It will have a window overlooking something nice, and my cats will sit in the windowsill looking at birds (one of my life goals is to become a crazy catlady (not to be confused with a crazy catwoman) and I pretty much have the crazy part down, just need a kitty or ten), and there will be lots and lots and lots of fabric, in every color and pattern! It will be good and fine and fentestically fentestic!

Here are some wonderful and inspiring sewing rooms that I kinda wish I had:

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Aren’t they nice and inspiring?

By the way, for those of you who desperately wondered how my shawl turned out, here it is:

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And in action:

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Love, Elin

Momo

When I was a kid (around 7 or 8), I read German author Michael Ende’s book The Neverending Story (1983) ten times in a row. I’m not exaggerating – I think I had it checked out of the library for a whole year, probably hoping for it not to be a fantasy and to open up and take me to its world like it does main character Bastian. When I got a bit older, I discovered some of his other books, mainly the fantastic and amazing novel Momo (1973).

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Momo (or Momo oder Die seltsame Geschichte von den Zeit-Dieben und von dem Kind, das den Menschen die gestohlene Zeit zurückbrachte which Wikipedia informs me translates to Momo, or the strange story of the time-thieves and the child who brought the stolen time back to the people) is about a young, poor girl whose “superpower” is her amazing ability as a listener. Her listening skills help the other children (and adults) stretch their imaginations and solve their problems, basically making her their muse. She lives in the ruins of a theatre in relative happiness and harmony. Until the Men in Grey appear. They are thieves of time, convincing the adult population to “save” time by placing it in the Timesavings Bank for later use. However, after agreeing to do so, they forget all about the men – all that lingers is the idea that they should save time. The only person immune to their power is Momo, and she must save the city and her friends from the evil men.

Years later, this is still one of my favourite books, and one I strongly urge you all to read if you haven’t already. No matter what age you are.

Love, Mari

Ponyo on the Cliff

Yes, I love Gibli! I mean, who doesn’t? They’re the best!
And their 2008 animated film Ponyo on the Cliff, is no exception.

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It is kind of a twisted take on The Little Mermaid: Brunhilde is the fishy daughter of a wizard and the goddess of the ocean. Her father is working on a concoction that will bring the ocean back to its glory days, when dinosaurs walked the earth and swam the sea. His reason for doing this is that the humans are a selfish, polluting lot of idiots (so there is a nice moral there), and well, who can argue? However, Brunhilde is the adventures type and she soon escapes and travels to the surface where she meets a boy, Sosuke.
Sosuke saves Brunhilde from a glass jar she is stuck in and keeps her in a bucket (believing she is a normal gold fish) ,and names her Ponyo (which, honestly, is a much better name than Brunhilde). Ponyo is soon brought back to the ocean by her father, but she is determined to become a human and live together with Sosuke. In a daring escape, she spills all of the magical concoction into the ocean, thus disrupting the balance of the universe and dooming all humans to extinction.

But who cares when you can have legs and eat ham with your new best friend?

A storm approaches. Will the world be saved? And will Sosuke pass the final test?

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This is one of those Gibli films where you feel like you just enter in the middle of a story and get to tag along for a bit. Many questions are left unanswered (most of them regarding the wizard), but what the film lacks in story-building, it more than makes up for in charm. Ponyo is the cutest little freak to ever have come out of the ocean!

So yes, I highly recommend this film. And all other Gibli films.

Love, Elin

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Splash of Greatness

For my birthday last year, the o so highly exaulted Elin gave me an awesome orange and green fabric. That fabric has now finally become a skirt (and a dress, but let’s focus on the skirt for now).

Check it out:

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Part 1 040

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Skirt: Read! by Hanna Volle